Player Sues School After Football Injuries Result in Brain Injury

Those who suffer a concussion in Philadelphia should be given adequate time to recover from such an injury while those charged with their care have a duty to protect them from further harm. Yet for those who participate in potentially violent activities, does their choice to participate absolve others from any blame should their concussion symptoms worsen?

In recent years, the topic of concussions in football has sparked debates, policy changes within professional and amateur football’s governing bodies, and even lawsuits filed on behalf of players suffering from the lingering effects of multiple concussions. These actions have sparked changes in concussion protocols at both the professional and collegiate levels that mandate the players not resume full contact activity until they’ve completely overcome the effects of a concussion.

A former player is currently suing the Ohio school he played for for failing to properly treat him after he developed a concussion. The young man claims that he was permitted to return to full contact activities before being evaluated by the team doctor. He sustained further blows to the head after returning to the team, which resulted in another concussion and ultimately left him with a permanent brain injury.

While many still debate whether football hits to the head can result in permanent disability, the guidelines established to protect players from returning to the field of play following a concussion too quickly are very clear. A failure to follow those guidelines may be viewed as negligence. Those looking to hold a school or program accountable for such negligence may wish to first consult with a personal injury attorney.

Source: The Plain Dealer, “Concussion resulted in brain injury to football player due to negligence of Baldwin Wallace University, lawsuit claims,” Karen Farkas, June 24, 2014